Trans Mission: Kate Adair on HB2, and Changing Media & Society

^A89857A8A7B20DD38F4FD2FCACE50A69AC627B58F6DF06D08D^pimgpsh_fullsize_distr

TransEthics: Tell us what you do for the BBC.

Kate Adair: What I do is work on a platform called BBC The Social. It’s an online space giving a platform to new and emerging content creators. It’s about letting people make what we are passionate about. In my case I started with a couple of a Trans 101 videos and have recently moved on to doing a weekly thing called queer bites where I get to discuss a topic of the week… usually I take it from something that I have seen in the news or something big from the world of LGBTQI+ society, but I do admit I’m bias a little towards the trans content. I’m a trans person who leads on creating what I make, script, film and edit my own stuff and the BBC listens to my views and allow me to make what I feel is relevant and important. They tend not to change or alter what I say and —at least with the social— are happy to listen to my lead on whats needing to be said and put out there.  Continue reading

Trans Analysis: Zinnia Jones on Dysphoria, Conversion Therapy, and Forgiveness

^2B310B6A549FB198AA50BB8948

TransEthics: At what age did you begin transition?

Zinnia Jones: I started medically transitioning when I was 23. I was living as a woman full-time for at least several months prior, and I was frequently being read as a woman in public for a couple years before that.

TE: Is your family supportive?

ZJ: My partner Heather has always been extremely supportive and encouraging. She gave me an environment where living as a woman was something comfortable, welcomed, and desirable. She was probably the biggest contributing factor to me finally finding the confidence to start HRT – particularly because we both knew that, if anything, this would make me even more attractive to her, not less. Our kids have been very understanding and it’s been a total non-issue. They’ve always known me as a woman and they were relatively young at the time I started transitioning, and Heather was able to explain it to them in a straightforward and age-appropriate way: that some girls have “boy bodies” and vice versa, and I was taking medicine to give me a “girl body”. Continue reading

Trans Schooling: Kelli Lox on Drugs, Sexuality, and an Academy for Trans Girls

CITOnReUMAA-GpO

TransEthics: What do you do besides escorting?

Kelli Lox: I star in porn, and I have lots of projects in the works. And I interact with fans and peers on twitter. which is super fun.

TE: Your tweets are both insightful and witty. What inspires your sense of humor?

KL: Well… my PR lady tells me not to talk about drugs in interviews, so … ummmm. … I guess my love of history, and science, and real-world interests and hobbies. I genuinely find so many things interesting and I love being able to share that. I like taking things that ppl don’t see often together, like spirituality and sex, or history and sex, or, well anything plus sex really (laughs) and putting them together in novel ways that makes people think while they laugh, and pull down their pants to masturbate. I have that freedom to tweet about anything I want to, and the brains to make it clever, thank goodness. Sometimes, I am actually educating people about something, but really I’m just making a dumb joke. I love that. Continue reading

Trans Standards: Michelle Austin on Body Positivity, Beauty Expectations, and Changing the Game

^2D1B914883B9BFA6D820EDB53F334E38A133ADB7FEFDCCF57E^pimgpsh_fullsize_distr

TransEthics: What were you doing before you got into sex work?

Michelle Austin: I was a hair dresser. I spent over eight years working in a high-end salon in Chicago area. It was the best experience I ever had but after eight plus years the owner shut it down. We both went to work for another salon but I fell out of love for the industry. I think it had to do more so with I was depressed with the Chicago weather and having back and hand issues. Which comes from doing that kind of work. I also transitioned in that job. So, part of me misses it because it’s a big part of my life. I ran the salon the last two years which also helped me learn a lot of business skills I carry with me today.

TE: What attracted you to the sex industries? Continue reading

Trans Erasure: Riley Alejandro on Non-Binary Issues, Genderfucking, and Media

IMG_20150412_013002067_HDR

TransEthics: When did you first realize that you’re transgender?

Riley Alejandro: I didn’t know that transgender was a thing until I was at least in my teens, probably around thirteen or fourteen, when I had access to the internet. I first started expressing issues with being told I was a girl around 8 is my first thought of it, telling my parents that I wasn’t a girl, that I was a boy and making up a lie as to why. I was forced to go to therapy. That’s when I also learned that this wasn’t something that people accepted too well. Continue reading

Trans Brilliance: CN Lester on Music, Psychology, Gender, and Activism

'You'+image

TransEthics: I’ve interviewed a couple of non-binary people in the past. How do you define “non-binary”?

CN Lester: I would probably say that I don’t define it — I think the very appeal is that there is no fixed definition — or, rather, than everyone has their own, and we respect individual interiority — that’s the whole point. I don’t personally used the term non-binary (unless repeating someone else’s choice to use it) for a number of reasons.

The main reason being that gender is not a binary. Sex is not a binary. It never has been, it never will be, and I object to having to define myself, and the whole complex web of humanity, in reference to a lie which has caused untold damage. As ever, that’s not to say that men and women aren’t men and women — just that there have always been more descriptors than just those two, that those descriptors need not be fixed to specific entry requirements, and that every person (man, woman, neither, both, either, more options) will have their own take on what gender and sex mean.

TE: What does gender mean to you? Continue reading

Trans Experience: Sophia Banks on Privilege, Cyber-bullying, and Trans Liberation

image1

Editor’s note: Trigger warning for violence as a first-hand account of violence against Ms. Banks is discussed. 

TransEthics: There are many who would consider you a leader in the trans community. How does that make you feel?

Sophia Banks: Uncomfortable, to be honest. I don’t think of myself as a leader. I am not really into the concept of leaders. I am glad and honoured I inspire some folks and have a platform to educate people. But being seen as leader makes me uncomfortable. Rising to a sort of level where I am seen as an authority has always been weird for me. I started out just speaking my truth as a trans woman pissed off about shit and things kinda blew up. One thing I hate about being seen as a leader is how I am expected to act strong all the time, never feel weak or insecure. It all happened so fast as I was going through my own transition and the struggles that come with that. Continue reading