Trans Mission: Kate Adair on HB2, and Changing Media & Society

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TransEthics: Tell us what you do for the BBC.

Kate Adair: What I do is work on a platform called BBC The Social. It’s an online space giving a platform to new and emerging content creators. It’s about letting people make what we are passionate about. In my case I started with a couple of a Trans 101 videos and have recently moved on to doing a weekly thing called queer bites where I get to discuss a topic of the week… usually I take it from something that I have seen in the news or something big from the world of LGBTQI+ society, but I do admit I’m bias a little towards the trans content. I’m a trans person who leads on creating what I make, script, film and edit my own stuff and the BBC listens to my views and allow me to make what I feel is relevant and important. They tend not to change or alter what I say and —at least with the social— are happy to listen to my lead on whats needing to be said and put out there.  Continue reading

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I’ve had some issues lately that have prevented me from interviewing as often as I’d like to, including being without a computer for several months. A more common issue has been having my not having a consistent internet connection. To guarantee a consistent connection, I’ve set up a Patreon account located here. I have set the monthly goal for the cost of my connection, but you can donate any amount monthly to help keep TransEthics operating. Please visit the page for reward information.

 

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Victoria Darling

Trans Standards: Michelle Austin on Body Positivity, Beauty Expectations, and Changing the Game

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TransEthics: What were you doing before you got into sex work?

Michelle Austin: I was a hair dresser. I spent over eight years working in a high-end salon in Chicago area. It was the best experience I ever had but after eight plus years the owner shut it down. We both went to work for another salon but I fell out of love for the industry. I think it had to do more so with I was depressed with the Chicago weather and having back and hand issues. Which comes from doing that kind of work. I also transitioned in that job. So, part of me misses it because it’s a big part of my life. I ran the salon the last two years which also helped me learn a lot of business skills I carry with me today.

TE: What attracted you to the sex industries? Continue reading

Trans Experience: Sophia Banks on Privilege, Cyber-bullying, and Trans Liberation

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Editor’s note: Trigger warning for violence as a first-hand account of violence against Ms. Banks is discussed. 

TransEthics: There are many who would consider you a leader in the trans community. How does that make you feel?

Sophia Banks: Uncomfortable, to be honest. I don’t think of myself as a leader. I am not really into the concept of leaders. I am glad and honoured I inspire some folks and have a platform to educate people. But being seen as leader makes me uncomfortable. Rising to a sort of level where I am seen as an authority has always been weird for me. I started out just speaking my truth as a trans woman pissed off about shit and things kinda blew up. One thing I hate about being seen as a leader is how I am expected to act strong all the time, never feel weak or insecure. It all happened so fast as I was going through my own transition and the struggles that come with that. Continue reading

Trans Reality: Jen Richards on Trans Activism, Community, and Sex Work

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TransEthics: What inspired you to come up with the Trans 100?

Jen Richards: The seed of the original idea began with co-founder Toni D’Orsay. She had wondered aloud on her Facebook who would be in a Forbes style top 100 trans people. She asked for people to suggest names in the comments. I put in a few, then tried to go to sleep. But as is my issue, my brain did not comply, and I began thinking about all the possibilities of a list of 100 trans people. I got back up and called Toni (we had met through We Happy Trans, my earlier project) and we began discussing ideas.  Continue reading

Trans Undaunted: Brooke Zannell on Restrooms, Porn, and Being a Trans Teen

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Trans Ethics: How did you get started in the Industry?

Brooke Zannell: I was traveling with TS Lady Godiva escorting, we were in Hollywood, Florida and she asked if I wanted to come with her to her photo shoot with Tonya for Tonyaworld.com. And Tonya asked if I wanted to shoot and I did. I fell in love with the camera.

TE: You do have a flair for it. What awards were you nominated for at the 2015 Transgender Erotica Awards?

BZ: The Transcendence Awards sponsored by Dr. Sinclair
Continue reading

Trans Intersection: Tasha Jones on Being Intersex, Empowerment, and Self-Promotion

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Trans Ethics: How did you get started in the Industry?

Tasha Jones: I got started back in 1997 doing webcam shows for a company called “Video Secrets”. That lead me to open my own websites. When I started doing webcam shows and building my sites, I had no idea what I was doing or where this would lead me. I only knew I liked the attention, and the sex I was getting, made this job seem like the best job I ever had. I did my first video (never released) in 1998, it was really bad. (laughter) But [it was] fun to make and I saw what I could do to improve my “acting” as well as my performance in front of the camera. This lead me to team up with Todd & Mandy where I had the pleasure of working with them on 6 different DVD releases.

TE: Which of those DVDs was your favorite? Continue reading