Trans Reporting: Katelyn Burns on Writing, Politics, and Moving Forward

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TransEthics: What inspired you to get into writing for various media establishments?

Katelyn Burns: I never really set out to be a writer or even an activist really. I’ve always been fairly political and my interest in trans politics and theory extend back even into my teenage years. I always did a good job covering my tracks, so all of my reading was done in secret when I was still in the closet. One day, after I had decided to transition but before I had started hormones or come out to many people, I was really struggling with my own body. I’d lost 110 pounds already but still had a lot of internal baggage to work through. My therapist suggested writing about it as a therapeutic method. Continue reading

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Trans Controversial: Kelly Klaymour on the Sex Industry, SJWs, and Ethics in Feminism

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TransEthics: What is it that first attracted you to sex work?

Kelly Klaymour: I thought there was way more money in it than there actually is… like enough to pay for SRS kind of scrilla. [But] little did I know… (laughs) Plus, I never have really had issue with being naked, so hey why not get to bone [girls who are] way out of my league and –what I thought would be– a decent living. (laughter)

TE: You mentioned before that you tend to be a bit more conservative than others I’ve interviewed. Would you expand a little on that?

KK: Sure thing. I had considered myself quite far on the left side, until being apart of this community for an extended amount of time. I’ve slowly realized I’m what’s considered a “shitlord” of sorts now (laughs). I guess my main issue that ends up blowing up into debates over social media is my opinion that nobody is entitled to [porn]work, and that I support the industry as a free market capitalistic complex.

TE: Having said that, I’ve noticed there seems to be a very public struggle on social media between independent porn studios, and the established big-name TS porn companies. Do you have any thoughts on that? Continue reading

Trans Brilliance: CN Lester on Music, Psychology, Gender, and Activism

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TransEthics: I’ve interviewed a couple of non-binary people in the past. How do you define “non-binary”?

CN Lester: I would probably say that I don’t define it — I think the very appeal is that there is no fixed definition — or, rather, than everyone has their own, and we respect individual interiority — that’s the whole point. I don’t personally used the term non-binary (unless repeating someone else’s choice to use it) for a number of reasons.

The main reason being that gender is not a binary. Sex is not a binary. It never has been, it never will be, and I object to having to define myself, and the whole complex web of humanity, in reference to a lie which has caused untold damage. As ever, that’s not to say that men and women aren’t men and women — just that there have always been more descriptors than just those two, that those descriptors need not be fixed to specific entry requirements, and that every person (man, woman, neither, both, either, more options) will have their own take on what gender and sex mean.

TE: What does gender mean to you? Continue reading