Trans Triumphs: Christy Pierson on Realizing Childhood Dreams, Religion, and Sexuality

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TransEthics: When did you come out as transgender?

Christy Pierson: Initially in 1999 when I was living in North Idaho, but there was not enough support there to transition. There had been a trans woman on a local Police Dept who had lost her job because of being trans right around that time too. She later was awarded back pay and her job back. I decided that the time was not correct and headed back into being all the man I could be.

Ten years later in 2009 is when I could no longer keep the door on it’s hinges or patch it up enough and I admited to being Christy. It really was a life or death time… I was drinking myself to death.

TE: There’s a lot of stories in the media regarding trans children. When you hear such stories, are you envious at all?

CP: Yes and No. Yes, because there are things which would not have developed and I now need to correct. Such as trachea, facial hair and voice among other things. Continue reading

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Trans Brilliance: CN Lester on Music, Psychology, Gender, and Activism

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TransEthics: I’ve interviewed a couple of non-binary people in the past. How do you define “non-binary”?

CN Lester: I would probably say that I don’t define it — I think the very appeal is that there is no fixed definition — or, rather, than everyone has their own, and we respect individual interiority — that’s the whole point. I don’t personally used the term non-binary (unless repeating someone else’s choice to use it) for a number of reasons.

The main reason being that gender is not a binary. Sex is not a binary. It never has been, it never will be, and I object to having to define myself, and the whole complex web of humanity, in reference to a lie which has caused untold damage. As ever, that’s not to say that men and women aren’t men and women — just that there have always been more descriptors than just those two, that those descriptors need not be fixed to specific entry requirements, and that every person (man, woman, neither, both, either, more options) will have their own take on what gender and sex mean.

TE: What does gender mean to you? Continue reading

Trans Intersection: Tasha Jones on Being Intersex, Empowerment, and Self-Promotion

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Trans Ethics: How did you get started in the Industry?

Tasha Jones: I got started back in 1997 doing webcam shows for a company called “Video Secrets”. That lead me to open my own websites. When I started doing webcam shows and building my sites, I had no idea what I was doing or where this would lead me. I only knew I liked the attention, and the sex I was getting, made this job seem like the best job I ever had. I did my first video (never released) in 1998, it was really bad. (laughter) But [it was] fun to make and I saw what I could do to improve my “acting” as well as my performance in front of the camera. This lead me to team up with Todd & Mandy where I had the pleasure of working with them on 6 different DVD releases.

TE: Which of those DVDs was your favorite? Continue reading