Trans Schooling: Kelli Lox on Drugs, Sexuality, and an Academy for Trans Girls

CITOnReUMAA-GpO

TransEthics: What do you do besides escorting?

Kelli Lox: I star in porn, and I have lots of projects in the works. And I interact with fans and peers on twitter. which is super fun.

TE: Your tweets are both insightful and witty. What inspires your sense of humor?

KL: Well… my PR lady tells me not to talk about drugs in interviews, so … ummmm. … I guess my love of history, and science, and real-world interests and hobbies. I genuinely find so many things interesting and I love being able to share that. I like taking things that ppl don’t see often together, like spirituality and sex, or history and sex, or, well anything plus sex really (laughs) and putting them together in novel ways that makes people think while they laugh, and pull down their pants to masturbate. I have that freedom to tweet about anything I want to, and the brains to make it clever, thank goodness. Sometimes, I am actually educating people about something, but really I’m just making a dumb joke. I love that. Continue reading

Advertisements

Trans Artisan: Courtney Trouble on Gender, The Effects of Transphobia, and Art

Courtney

TransEthics: What did you do before you got into sex work?

Courtney Trouble: I started doing phone sex as a job a few months after my eighteenth birthday because between college, my personal projects, and trying to be a freelance writer, I didn’t have the time or interest to stay at an entry-level retail or food job. I just didn’t have it in me. I was initially attracted to sex work because I wanted to work on my art (which at that time, were photography, zines, websites, and music) instead of work at someone’s store. I’ve been doing some sort of internet-based sex work since 2002. So what did I do before sex work? Be a teen, I guess. A nerdy, super creative, artistic, baby riot grrrrl who didn’t want a corporate job.

TE: When did you decide to move beyond working the phones? Continue reading

Trending Trans: Bridging the gap between morality and sex work.

cropped-te_headermaster.png

Considering the interviews I have done so far, it’s clear that most humans are highly sexual creatures. The problem is over the centuries we have been told to repress these feelings, and that they are “wrong” — largely due to what many would claim are archaic monotheistic beliefs. In many ways, the repression of our sexual nature as humans is similar to repressing ones’ feelings when it comes to being transgender.

Society looks at trans people through very strict gender stereotypes: a binary male/female. Anyone having feelings that don’t coincide with one’s assigned birth gender is categorized as a “misfit”, a “freak”, or even in some extreme cases, an “abomination”. So a lot of trans women repress these feelings, often for self-preservation. But just like repressing the sexual nature of humans, it only works for so long.

In the 21st Century, there has been a revolution surrounding transgender people. And like the Trans Women of Color who started the Stonewall Riots, trans people are giving society the finger and being who they truly are. This has not occurred without pushback, however. Trans people are still excluded from equal rights laws and protections that are given to other minorities simply because our gender does not coincide with what society would push onto us.

Trans women are often rejected by their families when they come out. There are people who paint us in an extremely negative light, and even lie about us to perpetuate fear and the idea that “something is wrong” with us. The media then frequently sensationalizes us for a profit. The reality is that hormones are not cheap. Neither are the surgeries some (if not many) of us desire. The stigma of being trans is so much larger than the stigma surrounding sex, and by extension sex work.

It is important to mention that not all trans women have done sex work. However as Janet Mock pointed out in her book Redefining Realness it is an option many trans women turn to in order to afford the costs of transition, if for no other reason than the discrimination and stigma that surrounds being a trans woman makes it difficult to find employment.

Coupled with the stigma behind being transgender, and the perpetuation of negative imagery coming from both the Christian right and radical feminists, many trans women are unable to find employment outside the sex work industry. As Ada Black pointed out in her recent interview, there are trans women who turn to sex work just to be able to afford the basic necessities of life, stating that that it is “heartbreaking”.

So how can we destigmatize sex work? There has been and will always be a demand for it, with humans being sexual creatures. Since sex sells, what’s wrong with buying it? Isn’t supply and demand a fundamental economic factor? If you’re fulfilling a need that can’t be met elsewhere, isn’t that ethical? And as long as capitalism is forcing trans women to pay through the nose for hormones and surgeries, why shouldn’t we use the sex industry as a source for the money we will need? That’s ethical. Isn’t it?

Keeping it Real: Interview with Chelsea Poe

ChelseaPoe

Trans Ethics: You recently started a petition to get websites to stop using terms like ‘”tranny” and “shemale”. How is that coming along?

Chelsea Poe: A few sites changed their policy after the petition was launched in November. Right now only 3 major companies still use the term “shemale” and I think sites like Trans 500 are the future of trans porn. That is high quality, mainstream porn that just happens to be of trans women without the offensive terms. I’ve been working with Nica Noelle and Courtney Trouble a lot lately and I think they are also bringing an entire new view of trans sexuality from a really artistic place. Their porn is also going to bring a lot of changes to what the state of trans porn is in the future.

TE: There are some models out there who actively promote themselves using those terms, not finding them offensive at all. How do you respond to the models that don’t have an issue with those terms? Do you think they perpetuate a negative stereotype? Continue reading

About TransEthics

TransEthics

TransEthics is a blog about ethical porn, ethical sex work, being submissive, and thoughts on trans issues — all from the perspective of a trans lesbian. It is not my intent to state that is is a resource or listing of the ethical standards of trans women. Far from it. This is 100% from my perspective. Nothing more.

I will be including links to some erotic content. As the URL suggests, I am a huge fan of Niki Flux, so don’t be surprised if you see some of her stuff here. Who knows? I may get lucky enough to interview her. **dreams on**