Trans Dreams: Kailee Keller on Jobs, Restrooms, and Success

Kailee

TransEthics: What is it that attracted you to the Adult Industry?

Kailee Keller: Well as like anyone and everyone, I love porn (laughs). I actually didn’t really seek it out though, the industry kinda found me. I always had it in the back of my head that I know I could do porn, and I would probably be good at it. I started camming a long time ago to make a little side money in college when things were rough, and I really enjoyed it, so I knew I would enjoy doing professional shoots with websites! Continue reading

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Trans Gaming: Brianna Wu on Gamer Culture, Harassment, and Caitlyn Jenner

BriannaWu

TransEthics: How long have you been in Game-related journalism?

Briana Wu: A lot of people don’t know this about me, but my background is in journalism, specifically investigative journalism. But most of my work was in in crime and local reporting. I do write game related op-eds as part of my job these days, but I see myself as more of a developer than a journalist.

I think if you look at who has the power to change the industry in historic terms, game journalists don’t have as much as developers. Yes, they get to communicate about their tastes to a wide audience, but ultimately they are commenting on other people’s work. To me, the act of creating is much more interesting than commenting.
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Trans Artisan: Courtney Trouble on Gender, The Effects of Transphobia, and Art

Courtney

TransEthics: What did you do before you got into sex work?

Courtney Trouble: I started doing phone sex as a job a few months after my eighteenth birthday because between college, my personal projects, and trying to be a freelance writer, I didn’t have the time or interest to stay at an entry-level retail or food job. I just didn’t have it in me. I was initially attracted to sex work because I wanted to work on my art (which at that time, were photography, zines, websites, and music) instead of work at someone’s store. I’ve been doing some sort of internet-based sex work since 2002. So what did I do before sex work? Be a teen, I guess. A nerdy, super creative, artistic, baby riot grrrrl who didn’t want a corporate job.

TE: When did you decide to move beyond working the phones? Continue reading

Trans Action: Chelsea Poe on Activism, the Trans 100, and Violence Against Trans Women

CPoe

TransEthics: What does it mean for you to have been in the Trans 100 this year?

Chelsea Poe: It really meant a lot to me. Being recognized by the trans community for my activism is extremely humbling. I think for myself it validates what I have been doing in the industry thus far and really makes me motivated for the future.

TE: Your activism –especially where it intersects with sex work– has ruffled some feathers of late. Tell us about some of the challenges you’ve faced. Continue reading

Trans Orgasmic: Evie Eliot on Imagining a New Kind of Porn, Liberation, and Magic

evie

Trans Ethics: How did you get into the sex industry?

Evie Eliot: The very short version is that I just sort of woke up one morning and said “I’m going to make porn”. The longer version is that about seven years ago, I saw a film called the Third and the Seventh, by Alex Roman. It was the first time I’d ever seen something that fit the description “fine art cinema” for me, and at the end of it, the first thing I thought was, “I want to make porn that looks like this.” Back then though it was just “something I’d like to do”, in the same way as I wanted to say, travel South America. If someone had offered me an all expenses trip then I’d take it, but I wasn’t actually very serious about turning the idea into reality.

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