Help Support TransEthics

I’ve had some issues lately that have prevented me from interviewing as often as I’d like to, including being without a computer for several months. A more common issue has been having my not having a consistent internet connection. To guarantee a consistent connection, I’ve set up a Patreon account located here. I have set the monthly goal for the cost of my connection, but you can donate any amount monthly to help keep TransEthics operating. Please visit the page for reward information.

 

Thank you!

Victoria Darling

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Trans Balance: Wendy Summers on Corporate Life, Acceptance, and Polyamory

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TransEthics: How long have you been in the sex industries?

Wendy Summers: I started camming back in 2010. I kind of started on a lark — I was supposed to meet a friend for lunch and she cancelled at the last-minute. I got bored, so I logged into an account I had on iFriends and was shocked to find guys going gaga over me. I made an insane amount of money that first afternoon, so that night I sat down and put a business plan together. I started shooting pictures and video for my iFriends fan club by myself and realized it would be easier to have someone else behind the camera. I hired a photographer and things just sort of snowballed from there. I launched my self-produced solo website, www.wendysummers.com in February 2012.

It’s all grown out of my fan’s support for the work I do. One thing just lead to another. I must be doing something right, as I’ve been updating weekly for over 3 years and I’ve won the 2013 RISE Award for Best Shemale Performer (their choice of words) and three Transgender Erotica Awards over my career and well as xbiz and AVN nominations. It’s been an awesome journey so far. Continue reading

Trans Standards: Michelle Austin on Body Positivity, Beauty Expectations, and Changing the Game

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TransEthics: What were you doing before you got into sex work?

Michelle Austin: I was a hair dresser. I spent over eight years working in a high-end salon in Chicago area. It was the best experience I ever had but after eight plus years the owner shut it down. We both went to work for another salon but I fell out of love for the industry. I think it had to do more so with I was depressed with the Chicago weather and having back and hand issues. Which comes from doing that kind of work. I also transitioned in that job. So, part of me misses it because it’s a big part of my life. I ran the salon the last two years which also helped me learn a lot of business skills I carry with me today.

TE: What attracted you to the sex industries? Continue reading

Trans Controversial: Kelly Klaymour on the Sex Industry, SJWs, and Ethics in Feminism

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TransEthics: What is it that first attracted you to sex work?

Kelly Klaymour: I thought there was way more money in it than there actually is… like enough to pay for SRS kind of scrilla. [But] little did I know… (laughs) Plus, I never have really had issue with being naked, so hey why not get to bone [girls who are] way out of my league and –what I thought would be– a decent living. (laughter)

TE: You mentioned before that you tend to be a bit more conservative than others I’ve interviewed. Would you expand a little on that?

KK: Sure thing. I had considered myself quite far on the left side, until being apart of this community for an extended amount of time. I’ve slowly realized I’m what’s considered a “shitlord” of sorts now (laughs). I guess my main issue that ends up blowing up into debates over social media is my opinion that nobody is entitled to [porn]work, and that I support the industry as a free market capitalistic complex.

TE: Having said that, I’ve noticed there seems to be a very public struggle on social media between independent porn studios, and the established big-name TS porn companies. Do you have any thoughts on that? Continue reading

Trans Reality: Jen Richards on Trans Activism, Community, and Sex Work

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TransEthics: What inspired you to come up with the Trans 100?

Jen Richards: The seed of the original idea began with co-founder Toni D’Orsay. She had wondered aloud on her Facebook who would be in a Forbes style top 100 trans people. She asked for people to suggest names in the comments. I put in a few, then tried to go to sleep. But as is my issue, my brain did not comply, and I began thinking about all the possibilities of a list of 100 trans people. I got back up and called Toni (we had met through We Happy Trans, my earlier project) and we began discussing ideas.  Continue reading